How long does it take to complete my invitation suite?

I require 4-6 months lead time before your send out date (which is two months prior to your actual wedding date). The actual time that it takes from consult to completion can range anywhere from 2-3 months, but I like to have at least a one month buffer for any "just in case" moments. 

 

CAN I USE A DESIGN THAT YOU ALREADY CREATED?

Each of our stationery suites are custom designed specifically for the client that has commissioned me.  Thus, reusing them would be unfavorable. However, for some suites that have a uniform or dynamic design, such as a thin lined border, I am open to that. 

 

WHAT DO YOU CHARGE FOR CUSTOM DESIGN?

My rate for custom design has been and will continue to be a flat fee of $150. This fee covers the cost of invitation, RSVP, and an additional insert card, and any artwork for envelope liners and guest names for digital calligraphy.  Additional fees are charged should a customer request hand drawn maps, water color, marbled, or hand painted items, and complex layouts (such as a booklet or passport design). 

 

WILL I GET TO SEE MY INVITATIONS BEFORE THEY ARE PRINTED?

ABSOLUTELY! For every job we provide digital printed proofs on the desired cardstock and envelopes. In some cases, such as letterpress, foil stamping, embossing, and offset printed suites, you will not receive a proof in these print mediums, due to the cost and time to setup. Thus, a digital printed proof will be provided. 

 

WHAT ARE THE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN PRINT TYPES?

So glad you asked this question. Please see our samples and descriptions below. NOTE: There are plenty of additional print types such as raised ink, screen printing, and traditional engraving. Some of these we do not have photos of or have not printed with that particular medium. 

 
  DIGITAL PRINTING:  Full use of CMYK color inks. Allows for multiple colors, shades, and hues to be printed all at once. Cost effective and high quality.   Photo by  Cavin Elizabeth Photography .

DIGITAL PRINTING: Full use of CMYK color inks. Allows for multiple colors, shades, and hues to be printed all at once. Cost effective and high quality.  Photo by Cavin Elizabeth Photography.

  OFFSET/FLAT PRINT:  Film plates are created to transfer liquid Pantone Inks onto paper. Great for printing on dark card stock; print with gold, silver, and bronze metallic inks. Also great for working with thicker card stock that can't be fed through a digital printer.   Photo by  Acres of Hope Photography

OFFSET/FLAT PRINT: Film plates are created to transfer liquid Pantone Inks onto paper. Great for printing on dark card stock; print with gold, silver, and bronze metallic inks. Also great for working with thicker card stock that can't be fed through a digital printer.  Photo by Acres of Hope Photography

  FOIL STAMP:  This is hot foil stamping. Where a copper plate is heated up and then foil is transferred to the paper.  Photo by  Cavin Elizabeth Photography.

FOIL STAMP: This is hot foil stamping. Where a copper plate is heated up and then foil is transferred to the paper. Photo by Cavin Elizabeth Photography.

  BLIND EMBOSS:  A copper plate has a design etched into it. The plate is then pressed from the back to create a raised effect. The lack of color is referred to as "blind".  Photo by  Cavin Elizabeth Photography.

BLIND EMBOSS: A copper plate has a design etched into it. The plate is then pressed from the back to create a raised effect. The lack of color is referred to as "blind". Photo by Cavin Elizabeth Photography.

  LETTERPRESS:  A copper plate or litho plate is used to press color into the paper. Typically done on cotton papers to create more of a dramatic depression into the paper.  Photo by  Melissa Biador Photography.

LETTERPRESS: A copper plate or litho plate is used to press color into the paper. Typically done on cotton papers to create more of a dramatic depression into the paper. Photo by Melissa Biador Photography.

  LASER ENGRAVE:  Use of a CO2 laser to engrave designs into wood, marble, acrylic, paper, leather, and more.  Photo by Cavin  Elizabeth Photography

LASER ENGRAVE: Use of a CO2 laser to engrave designs into wood, marble, acrylic, paper, leather, and more. Photo by Cavin Elizabeth Photography

  LASER CUT:  CO2 Laser cuts design out of card stock, acrylic, wood, corkboard, and other materials. Creates a very cool and dimensional effect.  Photo by  Chris Wojdak Photography

LASER CUT: CO2 Laser cuts design out of card stock, acrylic, wood, corkboard, and other materials. Creates a very cool and dimensional effect. Photo by Chris Wojdak Photography

  DIE CUT:  Steel rule die is formed into desire shape. The die is then used almost like a hole puncher, with applied pressure, the steel rule die cuts through a stack of sheets at all at once. Often used for round menus, tag shapes, escort cards, invitations, and more.   Photo by  Melissa Biador Photography.

DIE CUT: Steel rule die is formed into desire shape. The die is then used almost like a hole puncher, with applied pressure, the steel rule die cuts through a stack of sheets at all at once. Often used for round menus, tag shapes, escort cards, invitations, and more.  Photo by Melissa Biador Photography.

  THERMOGRAPHY:  Also known as Raised Ink printing. Plates are made that stamp wet ink onto the sheet (much like the process of  FLAT PRINTING ), a thin layer of coating is added to the wet ink and then finished through a heat source, forming an effect that is raised off of the paper.   Photo By  Amy Lynn Photography

THERMOGRAPHY: Also known as Raised Ink printing. Plates are made that stamp wet ink onto the sheet (much like the process of FLAT PRINTING), a thin layer of coating is added to the wet ink and then finished through a heat source, forming an effect that is raised off of the paper.  Photo By Amy Lynn Photography